Controlling children’s passwords is a flagrant breach of their privacy

Controlling children’s passwords is a flagrant breach of their privacy

Posted September 13, 2020

Controlling children’s passwords is a flagrant breach of their privacy

  • Passwords, by definition, are secrets. We use them to identify ourselves to systems and gain authorized access to places that other people are denied access to.
  • Up to 74 per cent of parents control their children’s passwords. In other words, parents exercise more than just the right to inspect the child’s assets: they reserve the right to impersonate their child.
  • By taking control over the key elements of children’s identity at a formative time in their development, adults run the risk of impacting the fragile mechanisms their children need to begin understanding abstract concepts such as the right to privacy.
  • When account access is shared, so is accountability. When schools set up student accounts, they use tools like Google’s G Suite, Classroom and Microsoft Active Directory that enable them to control dangerously large numbers of identities. In the event of data breaches, it may come as a surprise to administrators to discover that accountability practically always falls onto school boards and districts.

| September 13, 2020